You are invited to contribute your story


You see on this page a collection of biographies and profiles reflecting the varied stories of women who chose general practice as a career and who wanted to share their thoughts on that journey with those contemplating taking a similar path and others who have already embarked. 

If you would like to submit your story, or that of a colleague, for consideration for publication on the WiGP page, please send your contribution of up to four pages, to history@racgp.org.au along with a suitable image if you have one.  All submissions are reviewed by the History Screening Panel. 

A parallel initiative of the RACGP History Committee and Women in General Practice Committee is to gather the living histories of women in general practice ‘warts and all’ - not for publication to the website but to deliver the history of women in medicine to future generations. 

We would like to invite you to answer the following questions that are provided as a guide only, as you may have another story to tell. In particular, stories of the challenges and the critical role your gender may or may not have played within the experience and value of your medical career.

We are hoping to reflect on some of the celebrations as well as the commiserations of women in general practice and hope you feel able to contribute in a direct manner. We are aiming to build an archive of resources that may one day inform research projects. Access to your information will only be granted with your consent. Details of confidentiality and other aspects of access are available from RACGP History Program at history@racgp.org.au 

There is no word limit and we hope you can document your contribution to the profession of general practice in full detail. Please submit your response to history@racgp.org.au 

The question guide is: 

  • Who are you and what have you done to date in general practice?
  • How were you able to get where you are now?
  • What have been the highs?
  • What have been the lows?
  • What has been difficult?
  • What has helped?
  • Where are you hoping to go next?
  • What more needs to be done in general practice? 

Thank you 

Associate Professor Chris Hogan - Deputy Chair of the RACGP History Committee and Historian for RACGP Victoria