Skip to main navigation Skip to main content

On-demand webinar

Worm Bites, Taipan Allergy and September 11 Snakebite Tragedy: Lessons from The Book of Venom Members login for free access About RACGP online events

Details

Type: On-demand
Recorded: 3 Dec 2020

Contact

For more information:
Email: RACGP Rural
Call: 1800 636 764

Price

RACGP Members: FREE
Non-Members: FREE

Watch now

Worm Bites, Taipan Allergy and September 11 Snakebite Tragedy: Lessons from The Book of Venom

On-demand recorded 3 Dec 2020

Venomous bites and stings are a relatively common, but their effects can range in nature from minor discomfort right through to life-threatening envenomation syndromes and emergencies. While life threatening envenomations are relatively uncommon, this means that few GPs have the opportunity to develop expertise in the identification and treatment of patients who have experienced serious envenomation. This lack of exposure can, unfortunately, lead to poor outcomes. Given their geographical isolation and distance from the nearest hospitals, GPs in rural and remote areas of Australia in particular need to be knowledgeable regarding the recognition and management of potential toxinology emergency situations and envenomation syndromes. Rural GPs need up-to-date knowledge and skills to appropriately identify and treat bites and stings in their communities, diagnosis envenomation syndromes, avoid potential treatment hazards, and implement best practice treatment processes.

Learning outcomes

  1. List the major marine and terrestrial envenomation syndromes in Australia
  2. Describe the key principles in the diagnosis of major marine and terrestrial envenomation syndromes in Australia
  3. Discuss the important hazards in the management of major marine and terrestrial envenomation syndromes in Australia
  4. Define the key resources available to assist in the management of major marine and terrestrial envenomation syndromes in Australia
This event attracts 2 CPD points

This event attracts 2 CPD points

Presenter

Dr Ken Winkel
Senior Research Fellow

Dr Ken Winkel is a Senior Research Fellow within the School of Population and Global Health at the University of Melbourne and Honorary Fellow of the University's Medical History Museum. A leading Australian toxinologist, he was the Director of the Australian Venom Research Unit [AVRU: 1999-2015] and has now moved to one of the worlds’ leading schools of public health.

Sponsor

Advertising

© 2021 The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) ABN 34 000 223 807