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Chapter 6: The future of the general practice workforce

6.2 The experience of GPs in training

Only 14% of GPs in training report they are concerned about whether they will be able to secure employment on completion of the training program, compared to one in four non‑GP specialists, and one in three interns (Figure 62).

GPs in training with the RACGP’s Fellowship Pathways are satisfied with their training. Eighty-four per cent would recommend their training position to other doctors, and eight in 10 would recommend their workplace as a place to train.55

When compared to their peers, GPs in training feel well supported in their workplace. They are also less likely to experience workplace conflict, feelings of being unappreciated and difficulty accessing senior clinicians, and are not as adversely affected by requirements to work overtime as their peers in other specialty training pathways (Figure 63).

However, GPs in training do report a greater impact from dealing with patient expectations than their peers report (Figure 63).

84%
of GPs in training would recommend their training position to other doctors 55

Figure 62. Most GPs in training are confident they will find employment on completion of training*

Most GPs in training are confident they will find employment on completion of training

*Specialist GPs in training include respondents from all RACGP and ACRRM Fellowship pathways
Measure: Participants who selected ‘agree’ or ‘strongly agree’ in response to question, ‘Thinking about your future career, to what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements? I am concerned about whether I will be able to secure employment on completion of training/the pathway’, split by training cohort
Base: Interns, n = 587; prevocational and unaccredited, n = 1511; specialist non-GP, n = 2840; specialist GP, n = 1153
Data source: Medical Board of Australia and Ahpra. Medical Training Survey 2019: National report. Melbourne: MBA and Ahpra, 2019.

Figure 63. GPs in training report limited adverse effects from commonly raised training concerns*

GPs in training report limited adverse effects from commonly raised training concerns

*Specialist GPs in training include respondents from all RACGP and ACRRM Fellowship pathways
Measure: Participants who selected ‘never’, ‘most of the time’ or ‘always’ in response to the question ‘How often do the following adversely affect your wellbeing in your setting?’, split by training cohort
Base: Interns, n = 597; prevocational and unaccredited, n = 1545; specialist non-GP, n = 2872; specialist GP, n = 1174
Data source: Medical Board of Australia and Ahpra. Medical Training Survey 2019: National report. Melbourne: MBA and Ahpra, 2019.
 

Prior to commencement of RACGP-led training, GPs in training have varied views on their interactions with their colleges, although the majority report they are able to discuss the training program with other doctors (71%), and the requirements of their training program are clearly communicated (72%).56

  • 55. Medical Board of Australia and AHPRA. Medical training survey 2019: Report for The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. Melbourne: MBA and AHPRA, 2019.
  • 56. Medical Board of Australia and AHPRA. Medical training survey 2019: National report. Melbourne: MBA and AHPRA, 2019.

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