AGPT registrar training handbook

Your AGPT program

Local team

        1. Local team

Local team 

As a new registrar, you’ll be supported from the time you enter the AGPT program through to Fellowship. 

Your training program team includes a training coordinator and a medical educator (ME). Other people in your local team include a cultural mentor and an administrator, and for each general practice placement, a supervisor.   

Your local team is supported by regional and national RACGP services and teams. 

Training coordinator  

You’ll be allocated a training coordinator when you begin training. They’re a key contact and the first port of call for training-related queries, such as administrative tasks and requirements for training progression. Training coordinators work closely with the local medical education team.  

Medical educator  

MEs are experienced GPs with educational and practical knowledge in the general practice environment. They may also be external clinical visitors or supervisors within a practice. 

At the beginning of training, you’ll be allocated an ME who will mentor, guide and support you in your education and learning. Be aware though, that MEs usually work part time as they also work in general practice. If you need urgent assistance from an ME and yours isn’t available, please contact your training coordinator who will put you in touch with an available ME. 

Supervisor 

Supervisors are integral to GP training. As part of an apprenticeship model, a GP supervisor, as an experienced GP, is a professional role model, helping to lay the foundation for a registrar’s lifelong learning, professionalism and high-quality patient care.  

Supervisors provide advice and support, one-on-one teaching, supervision, feedback and assessment. In rural areas, a supervisor provides local information and support to the registrar and their family. Supervisors contribute to team-based learning in the practice setting, which will include other GPs and practice staff.  

Cultural mentor 

A cultural mentor is a member of the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community, and together with a cultural educator, supports registrars to develop cultural competency by providing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural and health education, including cultural safety training. 

A cultural mentor is a valuable resource for all registrars training in a particular area, helping them connect with the local community.  

You can go to your cultural mentor for information and advice on local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, cultural beliefs, values and practices. They can help you learn about appropriate communication and body language to use in general practice with patients who identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander. 

If you’re placed in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health training site, the cultural mentor will likely be involved in your in-practice orientation and will be available to assist you in your clinical practice.  

Cultural mentors may provide additional and individualised cultural support to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander registrars who are navigating living and working on country that’s either their own or that of another Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander group.

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