Pathway choices & RTO's


Frequently asked questions


The General Pathway is for doctors who choose to train primarily in inner and outer metropolitan locations. There are a range of benefits and opportunities associated with training on the General Pathway, for example:

  • access to specialist training including mental health, addiction medicine, paediatrics, anaesthetics, surgery and obstetrics; and
  • access to mentors and professional relationships.

AGPT registrars on the General Pathway must undertake twelve months of their training in a prescribed location.

Some RTOs may have restrictions on where some General Pathway registrars are able to train.


The Rural Pathway encompasses a large percentage of Australia reaching from towns on the fringe of capital cities, to regional coastal areas and remote outback locations.

This pathway offers a range of benefits and opportunities commensurate with the work of rural general practice, for example:

  • access to specialist training including mental health, addiction medicine, paediatrics, anaesthetics, surgery and obstetrics;
  • opportunity to develop and consolidate an extended scope of practice working more closely with local communities;
  • hospital and community-based primary care;
  • contributing to addressing the health needs of communities with decreased access to health care;
  • working alongside retrieval medicine teams;
  • access to mentors and professional relationships which may not be possible in metropolitan areas;
  • increased earning capacity—possible access to financial incentives not available in metropolitan locations; and
  • being immersed into local communities and lifestyle benefits of country living.


The Fellowship of the RACGP (FRACGP) is the same program for both the general and rural pathways, however, the context that the registrar is in significantly influences how those skills are utilised. Additionally, in the rural pathway the opportunity exists to develop further relevant rural skills by undertaking the Fellowship in Advanced Rural General Practice (FARGP). The AGPT Program has requirements in terms of where registrars may work according to their training pathway choice; general pathway registrars may work in any general practice location, whereas rural pathway registrars are required to work in rural and remote general practice placements.


FARGP is a specialist twelve-month program for registrars wishing to specialise in rural general practice. It is recommended that the FARGP is undertaken during general practice training to enable you to get the most out of your experience and fulfil the majority of FARGP requirements before heading into the FRACGP exams. FARGP can also be undertaken post-Fellowship. More information available at RACGP FARGP.


As a FRACGP general practitioner (GP), general practice earnings can be determined based on a number of factors, including, but not limited to hours worked, complexity, Medicare item numbers, number of patient presentations and billing practices.

When working in a general practice setting, Fellowed GPs earnings are supported through access to A1 Medicare rebates.

To find out more about what you can expect to earn in different practice settings visit GPRA NTCER to access the General Practice Registrars Australia (GPRA) earnings calculator. The calculator is based on the earnings of a Fellowed GP. Importantly, there is no difference in MBS patient rebates based on what general practice fellowship has been obtained.


The Modified Monash Model (MMM) is a geographical classification that categorises different areas in Australia into seven remoteness categories. This ranges from MM1 (metropolitan areas) to MM7 (very remote communities). This model will be in effect from 1 January 2020. Please refer to the below table for further information. All ACRRM positions are on the rural pathway.

Modified Monash Category Description including the Australian Standard Geographical Classification – Remoteness Area (2016)
MM 1 Metropolitan areas: Major cities accounting for 70% of Australia's population. All areas categorised ASGS-RA1.
MM 2 Regional centres: Areas categorised inner (ASGS-RA 2) and outer regional (ASGS-RA 3) that are in, or within a 20 km drive of a town with over 50,000 residents.
MM 3 Large rural towns: Areas categorised as inner (ASGS-RA 2) and outer regional (ASGS-RA 3) that are not in MM 2 and are in, or within 15km drive of a town between 15,000 and 50,000 residents.
MM 4 Medium rural towns: Areas categorised as inner (ASGS-RA 2) and outer regional (ASGS-RA 3) that are not in MM 2 or MM 3, and are in, or within a 10km drive of a town with between 5,000 and 15,000 residents.
MM 5 Small rural towns: All remaining inner (ASGS-RA 2) and outer regional (ASGS-RA3) areas. Islands with an MM 5 classification with less than 1,000 residents and without bridges to the mainland are now classified as MM 6.
MM 6 Remote communities: Remote mainland areas (ASGS-RA 4) AND remote islands located less than 5km offshore. Islands with an MM 5 classification with less than 1,000 residents and without bridges to the mainland are now classified as MM 6.
MM 7 Very remote communities: Very remote areas (ASGS-RA 5) and all other remote island areas more than 5 km offshore.

Table sourced from the ‘Modified Monash Model – Fact Sheet’.


Use the Pathway Eligibility Guide in the AGPT Eligibility Guidelines, available from the AGPT website to determine which pathway/s you are eligible for.

If you are subject to Section 19AB (also known as the 10 year moratorium), you are restricted to nominating rural pathway preferences only.


Applicants requiring more detailed information about their individual circumstances in relation to Section 19AB (including eligibility for an exemption) should contact the Department of Health, Access Programs Section by emailing 19AB@health.gov.au.

Please note: Be sure to advise them you are applying for the AGPT Program. Decisions on exemptions may take some time; the Department of Health advises applicants who wish to apply for an exemption, to do so prior to applying for the AGPT Program.

Applicants applying for the AGPT Program through the RACGP’s selection process who have applied for a Section 19AB exemption, but have not received a response by the close of applications will be required to nominate training region preferences on the rural pathway. If you then receive a letter of exemption from the Department of Health, you will be able to resubmit your training region preferences, provided you advise the RACGP prior to 2 June.


Doctors subject to Section 19AB of the Health Insurance Act 1973 can reduce their moratorium requirements (currently 10 years) by up to five years, depending on the Modified Monash Model (MM) of the location where they practice.

For more information, refer to the DoctorConnect Search ‘Section 19AB’.


No, you may choose to only nominate one training region preference. Applicants can nominate up to four preferences in their online application.


The general pathway provides opportunities for registrars to train in urban, rural and remote settings (i.e. MM 1-7 locations) within their training region. A training place on the general pathway does not guarantee that registrars will be able to undertake all of their training in an urban location. The training placement of a registrar is based on a range of factors including the registrar’s educational requirements and interests, the geography of the training region, and the workforce distribution requirement that registrars must complete 12 months of their training in a prescribed location (see below*).

Applicants are encouraged to contact the RTO in their preferred training region to find out more about the training opportunities available in each region, before submitting their final preferences.

*The location options available to registrars include:

  • Twelve months training in a rural location classified MM2-7; or
  • Twelve months in an outer metropolitan location; or
  • Twelve months training in a non-capital city classified as MM1; or
  • Twelve months training in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health training post in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health service or other approved Aboriginal Medical Service; or
  • Twelve months training comprising two of the following:
    • Six months training in an outer metropolitan location; or
    • Six months training in a rural location classified MM2-7; or
    • Six months training in a non-capital city classified MM1; or
    • Six months training in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health training post in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health service or other approved Aboriginal Medical Service.


Some RTOs manage more than one training region. Applicants who are interested in training in these regions must be aware of the following:

  • The three training regions covering the ACT and NSW are managed by one RTO. However, each region is run independently of the others.
  • If the location in which an applicant would like to train appears to straddle two or more regions, applicants should contact the relevant RTOs to determine the exact region in which the location falls.


In order to decide which RTO you would like to train with, it is recommended that you contact the RTOs you are interested in and ask them questions to help inform your decision. You can find the contact details for the RTOs here.


Registrars on the AGPT Program remain in their training region for the duration of training. Candidates should only nominate a training region they are willing to train in for the entire AGPT Program and if necessary, relocate to. While it is possible to transfer once training has begun, this needs to be approved by both RTOs involved. Transfers from rural to general pathways must be supported by evidence of exceptional circumstances that justify a pathway change, and be approved by the DoH.

Transfers between training regions and pathways are restricted and never guaranteed. For more information, please refer to AGPT Policies.


The Fellowship in Advanced Rural General Practice (FARGP) is a qualification awarded by RACGP in addition to the vocational Fellowship (FRACGP). The FARGP cannot be undertaken as a stand-alone qualification.

Candidates have four years to complete the requirements and achieve dual RACGP Fellowship (FRACGP, FARGP) or three years to complete the FRACGP.

It recognises additional skills training undertaken to meet specific community needs and help provide safe, accessible and comprehensive care in rural and remote communities.

To complete the requirements of the FARGP, candidates must satisfactorily complete:

  • the FARGP learning plan and reflection activity
  • 12 months in a rural general practice setting (MMM3–7)
  • 12 months of Additional Rural Skills Training (ARST) in an accredited procedural or non-procedural training post
  • a rural general practice community-focused project
  • the FARGP emergency medicine module, which includes a series of case studies, clinical skills audits, and two advanced emergency skills courses.


The FARGP provides training for registrars wishing to develop additional procedural or non-procedural skills. It is recommended that the FARGP is undertaken during general practice training to enable you to get the most out of your experience and fulfil the majority of FARGP requirements before heading into the FRACGP exams. FARGP can also be undertaken post-Fellowship.


Yes, the RACGP is currently developing a Rural Generalist Fellowship. The FARGP is being updated to align with a national Rural Generalist Medicine training pathway and will be replaced by a four year standalone Rural Generalist Fellowship (FRACGP-RG). There are two main streams of work ongoing:

  • Seeking recognition of Rural Generalist Medicine as a protected title and a specialised field within the specialty of general practice;
  • Updating the Fellowship in Advanced Rural General Practice (FARGP) curriculum to align with the requirements of a national Rural Generalist training framework.

The updated curriculum will also be submitted as part of the process in gaining recognition of Rural Generalist Medicine as a specialised field within the specialty of general practice.

As part of converting the FRACGP/FARGP into a standalone Fellowship, some elements of the current FARGP will be eliminated and other aspects strengthened.


Yes, the RACGP will start to incorporate key elements of the future FRACGP-RG fellowship into the Fellowship in Advanced Rural General Practice (FARGP) from 2021.

This will be a stepwise transition of our program to incorporate Rural Generalism and assist in a smooth, simple transition for trainees to the new Fellowship that would be launched upon accreditation. Immediate improvements will include working to further develop GP registrar skills training in emergency care.

Any registrars enrolled in the FARGP from 2021 can transition to the FRACGP-RG pathway once it’s accredited by the Australian Medical Council. The RACGP will work closely with current trainees to ensure they are completing the skills training which will allow them to complete a Rural Generalist Fellowship.


The AGPT Program provides a Rural Generalist Training Policy (AGPT RG) for candidates wishing to train towards becoming a Rural Generalist (RG).

150 training positions will be offered through RACGP nationally for the 2021 intake. AGPT RG candidates must select to train towards FRACGP combined with FARGP at the point of application.

Find out more about AGPT Rural Generalist Training


AGPT RG provides additional flexibility for registrars, including:

  • Up to 6 years from the start of training to gain FRACGP and FARGP (an additional, optional 52 weeks of funded training and support are available compared to those who choose to complete their FRACGP and FARGP without choosing the AGPT RG training option).
  • You can complete your ARST training in MMM-1 locations and / or with other RTOs if the placement required to complete your ARST is not available in the region in which you are training.
  • You will be classified as an RG. This will allow you to access all benefits associated with the classification of RG as a specialty within General Practice, should the application to the Medical Board of Australia be successful.

This future proofing of current RG training is underway and includes the refinement of the design of the FARGP and FRACGP training endpoint.


New RACGP applicants

  • Indicate interest in pursuing Rural Generalist Training by selecting the option on the application form
  • Select the rural pathway, and
  • Be seeking to work towards fellowship of RACGP combined with the Fellowship in Advanced Rural General Practice (FARGP).

Already enrolled with RACGP?

  • Opt in to Rural Generalist Training through the AGPT Program via RACGP.

The RACGP or the relevant Regional Training Organisation (RTO) will make contact and offer the applicant the opportunity to train under the AGPT Rural Generalist Policy 2020.


Applicants do not need to be enrolled in a State/Territory Rural Generalist Program in order to train under AGPT RG.

All AGPT registrars training on the AGPT Program prior to 2019 and who are enrolled in a State/Territory Rural Generalist Program will be given the opportunity to train under this policy.


Yes, you can opt into being classified as an RG and training as an RG later in your training journey.

This may be because you decide to undertake some Advanced Rural Skills Training (ARST) as you see the need for these skills in the community in which you are training or it may be because you have chosen to move to a remote or rural area that supports, and benefits from, your training in RG.

You may opt into being classified as an RG from any other pathway (general or rural).


Yes, if your circumstances change in the future, you may opt out of training as an RG but continue to train towards the FRACGP.

You will, however, need to remain on the rural pathway and continue to work in an MMM2-7 location.


For RACGP/FARGP this includes:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health;
  • Academic Practice;
  • Adult Internal Medicine;
  • Anaesthetics (JCCA);
  • Child Health;
  • Emergency Medicine;
  • Mental Health;
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology (DRANZCOG/DRANZCOG Advanced);
  • Palliative Care;
  • Surgery.

Other posts can be considered by the RACGP Rural Censor on application as part of an individually designed program e.g. dermatology.


Yes, the RACGP will start to incorporate key elements of the future FRACGP-RG fellowship into the Fellowship in Advanced Rural General Practice (FARGP) from 2021.

This will be a stepwise transition of our program to incorporate Rural Generalism and assist in a smooth, simple transition for trainees to the new Fellowship that would be launched upon accreditation. Immediate improvements will include working to further develop GP registrar skills training in emergency care.

Any registrars enrolled in the FARGP from 2021 can transition to the FRACGP-RG pathway once it’s accredited by the Australian Medical Council. The RACGP will work closely with current trainees to ensure they are completing the skills training which will allow them to complete a Rural Generalist Fellowship.

Read more about RACGP’s Rural Generalist Fellowship