Training and educational support

FSP Registrar Handbook
      1. Training and educational support

Training and educational support

The RACGP is committed to supporting registrars to achieve their training outcomes and satisfy the requirements of Fellowship. Throughout the training program you can access a variety of support for your education and training, including individualised training advice and planning (refer to Let’s get you started), pastoral care, focused learning interventions and Fellowship exam support (refer to Fellowship exams).

This section includes information about specific types of support for registrars who:

  • are from particular cohorts
  • require additional training and support because of identified needs.

Support for particular groups of registrars

Rural registrars

If you’re working in an MMM 3–7 area, we recommend you live in the rural community where you work to help you and your family connect with your rural community.

Your program team can give you information about available support, such as funding, family support, accommodation and local champions.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander registrars

Specific individualised support mentorship, cultural support, tailored supervision and practice support, and Fellowship exam preparation. Your training coordinator can help you access this support.

Culturally and linguistically diverse registrars

Support includes training in communication skills, orientation to AHPRA’s Good medical practice: a code of conduct for doctors in Australia, and individualised support as needed. Your training coordinator can help you access these types of support.

Educational support

If your program team and regional team have concerns about your performance and progress, they’ll work with you to identify and implement the most appropriate, targeted educational support or intervention for your circumstances.

Performance issues that require support may be minor and transient or more significant and persistent; there may be a single issue or multiple issues.

Concerns about performance and progress might involve:

  • communication skills
  • clinical skills
  • cognitive skills
  • organisational, integrative and collaborative skills
  • professional behaviour
  • other serious issues that might be reportable, including:
    • health and personal issues
    • work environment and systems issues.

Our educational support has a stepped approach (Figure 1):

  • early identification of registrars who need extra assistance
  • provide appropriate assistance and support
  • implement an educational intervention (eg focused learning intervention)
  • implement remediation.

Approach to educational support when there is a concern about performance and progress

Focused learning interventions

Your ME, supervisor or a clinical teaching visitor may identify that you have learning needs that require a focused learning intervention (FLI).

An FLI supports your learning with resources and activities to help address your learning needs.

You’ll work with your program team, training site staff and supervisor to develop an FLI specific to your needs. This collaborative approach is an important part of the process to ensure your particular needs are addressed.

The FLI is developed, implemented and completed within your program time. Everyone involved in developing the FLI must agree on the timeframe for completion.

Unfortunately, not all registrars who complete an FLI will demonstrate sufficient improvement. If this is the case, you may be required to:

  • undertake another FLI
  • undertake remediation
  • withdraw from training.

Remediation

At the end of an FLI, if you haven’t been able to demonstrate sufficient improvement in your performance, and if we believe that you may benefit from additional program time to address the performance concerns, we may decide that remediation is required. Remediation is a critical educational intervention to help address concerns about performance and ultimately help you progress towards Fellowship. We will work with you to develop a remediation plan.

The regional team will apply to the National Remediation Unit to commence remediation. You’ll be notified of the outcome within 25 business days of the completed application being received.

Please be aware that while waiting for approval of the remediation term we may place you on Category 2 leave if we identify a potential safety risk to you or the community if you continue training without remediation in place. Your program team will work closely with you if this is the case.

If the remediation application is approved, your program time will be suspended for the period of remediation, and you’ll be unable to enrol in or sit Fellowship exams, even if you are otherwise eligible. Your progress will be monitored throughout the period of remediation.

A remediation term is usually undertaken while continuing to work in community general practice. Following assessment of your learning requirements, an individualised plan will be developed in consultation with you. The plan may involve additional education, supervision, assessment and supports to improve your areas of learning need. Any additional costs associated with a remediation term are self-funded.

Outcomes of remediation

In most instances, remediation is successful and the concerns about performance are addressed. The registrar is then able to resume the training program.

However, in some instances, an additional intervention is required to address ongoing performance concerns. And occasionally, performance concerns remain at the end of remediation, and the result is withdrawal from the program.

Withdrawal may be necessary in the case of non-compliance with or refusal to comply with remediation, or if the term is not successfully completed. For more information about withdrawal, refer to Withdrawals and re-entry.