Key Feature Problem exam


Prepare for the Key Feature Problem (KFP) exam designed to assess your clinical decision making and reasoning skills.

Key Feature Problem exam


Prepare for the Key Feature Problem (KFP) exam designed to assess your clinical decision making and reasoning skills.

About the Key Feature Problem exam

The KFP exam is designed to assess clinical decision and clinical reasoning in practice. The KFP exam has 26 cases, each of which is composed of a number of questions. Each case contributes equally to the overall score, making each worth 3.85% of the total mark.

The exam is designed to represent a session in Australian general practice, so the demographics and case mix are drawn from the Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) data. Any aspect of the RACGP Curriculum may be tested and each case may contain more than one curriculum area.

The questions in the case may be either written responses (a few words or a sentence) or a selection list, where you have to choose a set number of responses from a list of answers. We recommend reading through the examples in the examination guide booklet to understand what to expect in the KFP exam.

Download the exam guide 

Understanding the KFP exam format

The KFP exam is in a format that many candidates may not have encountered. It is not a simple short-answer paper where you list all the possible answers; the answers need to be in the context of the clinical case, which means the answers will need to relate to the age and gender of the patient, the clinical information given, and the location of the patient (the question will specify whether the case is in a rural, regional or urban location).

One of the most common mistakes in the KFP exam is to provide multiple answers that are not in the context of the question. If candidates provide more answers than requested, they will be penalised for each extra answer.

The KFP exam is a 3.5-hour exam. However, a universal allowance of an additional 30 minutes has been granted to all candidates. This allows extra time for candidates for whom English is a second language, slow readers or for other reasons. All candidates are therefore given four hours to complete the KFP exam The 2023.1 KFP will be delivered face-to-face in exam venues in an online (computer-based) format via the AssessGP exam platform.

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Purpose of the KFP exam

The KFP exam is designed to assess clinical practice and clinical reasoning. It looks at how candidates assess patients in the context of the scenario given and consider the key features/critical steps required to resolve the clinical problem.  

Each question explores your understanding of the key features/critical steps. A ‘key feature’ is a critical step in the resolution of a clinical problem in the context of everyday Australian general practice. A KFP exam question consists of a clinical case scenario and questions that focus only on those critical steps.  

Clinical reasoning can be defined as thinking through the various aspects of patient care to arrive at a reasonable decision regarding the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of a clinical problem in a specific patient. Patient care includes history‐taking, conducting a physical exam, requesting laboratory tests and diagnostic procedures, designing safe and effective treatment regimens or preventive strategies, and providing patient education and counselling.  

Clinical reasoning plays a major role in a doctor’s ability to make diagnoses and decisions. It can be considered as the physician’s most critical competence. 

Upcoming dates

Deadline for KFP special arrangements applications 

Deadline for KFP withdrawals to receive a fee refund 

Friday 6 January 2023 



Preparing for the exam

The KFP exam looks at how candidates assess patients in the context of the scenario given, as well as the key features/critical steps required to resolve the clinical problem.

With this in mind, candidates should use their day-to-day practice to consider the differential diagnoses pertinent to the patient, and how this might vary from patient to patient, thinking about their steps of management.

Candidates should consider, for example, what the key investigations are and why they are so important, rather than doing a full screen; how they can manage the case by means other than medication; and how this might vary from patient to patient.  

Conducting a random case analysis with either a supervisor, mentor or a colleague can be an effective way for candidates to prepare for the KFP exam. This type of analysis is an invaluable way of breaking down the clinical process and reviewing its different stages.  

The KFP exam is about the assessment of the reasoning behind what GPs do every day in their clinical practice. It is important that candidates read widely and use resources, such as the Therapeutic guidelines and current management guidelines, to ensure their management is contemporary. 

Training support

General Practitioner Training Support Line:
1800 472 247
agpt.support@racgp.org.au