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Clinical guidance for MRI referral

Appendix 2

Internal document hyperlink repository

Bookmarks for seizures

Table 2.1 Generalised seizures

Table 2.1

Generalised seizures


Secondary generalised seizures start with a focal seizure before spreading to cause a generalised seizure.8
Table 2.2 Focal (partial seizures)

Table 2.2

Focal (partial seizures)


Table 2.3 Factors associated with intracranial pathology on neuroimaging after first seizure

Table 2.3

Factors associated with intracranial pathology on neuroimaging after first seizure


Figure 2.1 Prevalence of incidental findings in various age categories

Figure 2.1

Prevalence of incidental findings in various age categories


Reproduced with permission from British Medical Journal Publishing Group Ltd from Morris et al. Incidental findings on brain  magnetic resonance imaging: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ 2009;339:b3016 doi:10.1136/bmj.b3016.

Bookmarks for headaches


Table 2.4 Clinical patterns of primary headaches

Table 2.4

Clinical patterns of primary headaches


Reproduced with permission from National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) from Diagnosis of tension-type,  migraine and cluster headache, from Headaches: diagnosis and management of headaches in young people and adults.  National Clinical Guideline Centre. p 44.
Table 2.5 Intracranial tumours

Table 2.5

Intracranial tumours


Table 2.6 Giant cell arteritis

Table 2.6

Giant cell arteritis


Table 2.7 The SNOOP-4 mnemonic

Table 2.7

The SNOOP-4 mnemonic

Bookmarks for cervical radiculopathy


Table 2.8 Neurological features associated with cervical radiculopathy

Table 2.8

Neurological features associated with cervical radiculopathy


Reproduced with permission from British Medical Journal Publishing Group Ltd, from Barry M, Jenner JR. ABC of rheumatology.  Pain in neck, shoulder, and arm. BMJ 1995; 310(6973):183–6.
Figure 2.2 Upper limb dermatomes

Figure 2.2

Upper limb dermatomes


Reproduced with permission from Continuing Medical Education (CME) from Mogere E, Morgado T,  Welsh D. An approach to the painful upper limb. Continuing Medical Education 2013;31(3).  
Table 2.9 Signs of serious spinal or other abnormalities

Table 2.9

Signs of serious spinal or other abnormalities


Note there is insufficient available evidence to confirm the utility of conventional ‘red flag symptom’ for triaging non-acute  neck patients, although their use has been strongly encouraged.31

Bookmarks for cervical trauma


Table 2.10 NEXUS criteria

Table 2.10

NEXUS criteria


Adapted and reproduced with permission from the New England Journal of Medicine from Hoffman J, Mower W, Wolfson A, et al. Validity of a set of clinical criteria to rule out injury to the cervical spine in patients with blunt trauma. N Engl J Med 2000;343:94–9.

Bookmarks for the knee


Table 2.11

Table 2.11

The Ottawa knee rules


Reproduced with permission from The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners from Yao K, Haque T. The Ottawa knee rules:  a useful clinical decision tool. Aust Fam Physician 2012;41(4):223–4. 

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