e-Mental health - A guide for GPs


Encouraging patients to start using e-mental health
☰ Table of contents


Given the patient’s care may not be overseen by another health professional while they are using an e-mental health intervention, you will need to play an active role in encouraging patients to begin and stay in treatment.

Table 3. Patient beliefs that increase e-mental health engagement and related suggestions for GPs

Patient beliefs that increase engagement48–52

Suggestions for GPs to support engagement53
 

Positive expectations about treatment outcomes

Ensuring the patient has realistic expectations of the treatment

Addressing misconceptions about e-mental health treatment

Setting realistic goals for treatment

Demonstrating applicability of the therapeutic tasks to the patient’s life

Belief in the credibility of the program

Expressing confidence in the program

Including the program in a GP Mental Health Treatment Plan, with arrangements for proactive follow-up

Providing written information about the recommended program (eg a brochure, email or SMS)

Showing the patient how to use  Head to Health to review the efficacy of the program

Belief that the benefits of the program outweigh the costs (eg time and effort, financial outlay, challenge of learning new skills, stigma, risk of completing the program without any improvement)

Discussing the patient’s concerns about e-mental health and the recommended intervention

Highlighting the benefits to the patient in engaging in treatment (eg positive feelings associated with taking action to address issues, having a safe space to share thoughts and feelings)50

Helping the patient identify solutions to potential barriers that might arise in starting treatment (eg helping the patient schedule appointments to complete the program using a diary or calendar)

Enlisting the patient’s family (with the patient’s consent) to help them engage with the program


 
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