Your browser has 'Cookies' disabled, alert boxes will continue to appear without this feature.

Standards for health services in Australian prisons

References

1. WA Department of Justice; NSW Justice Health; SA Corrective Services; ACT Corrective Services; Tasmania Department of Justice; Queensland Government Department of Corrective Services; Victoria Department of Justice; NT Government Department of Justice. Standard guidelines for corrections in Australia. Revised 2004.

2. Standard guidelines for corrections in Australia. Revised 2004.

3. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. The health of Australia’s prisoners. Canberra: AIHW, 2009;106.

4. AIHW. The health of Australia’s prisoners, 2009;24–32.

5. AIHW. The health of Australia’s prisoners, 2009;87.

6. AIHW. The health of Australia’s prisoners, 2009;24–32.

7. Australian Bureau of Statistics. 4517.0 – Prisoners in Australia 2007. Available at www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/4517.0.

8. Holmwood C, Rae D. Prison health: a different place for GPs. Aust Fam Physician 2003;32:10.

9. Mainz J. Defining and classifying clinical indicators for quality improvement. International Journal for Quality in Healthcare 2003;15:523– 530.

10. Rubin HR, Pronovost P, Diette GB. The advantages and disadvantages of processbased measures of healthcare quality. International Journal for Quality in Healthcare 2001;13:469–474.

11. Mant J. Process versus outcome indicators in the assessment of quality of healthcare. International Journal for Quality in Healthcare 2001;13:475–480.

12. Rubin HR, Pronovost P, Diette GB. From a process of care to a measure: the development and testing of a quality indicator. International Journal for Quality in Healthcare 2001;13:489– 496.

13. Reason J. Human error: models and management. BMJ 2000;320:768–70.

14. Standard guidelines for corrections in Australia. Revised 2004.

15. Standard guidelines for corrections in Australia. Revised 2004;21–22.

16. Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care. 10 tips for safer healthcare. Canberra: ACSQHC online. Available at www.safetyandquality.gov.au.

17. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. Putting prevention into practice. South Melbourne: The RACGP, 1998.

18. Holmwood C, Rae, D. Prison health: a different place for GPs. Aust Fam Physician 2003;32:854–856.

19. Condon L, Hek G, Harris F. Users’ views of prison health services: a qualitative study. J Adv Nurs 2007;58:216–226.

20. Restum ZG. Public health implications of substandard correctional healthcare. Am J Public Health 2005;95:689–691.

21. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. Guidelines for preventive activities in general practice. 5th edn. South Melbourne: The RACGP, 2002.

22. RACGP. Putting prevention into practice, 1998.

23. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. Smoking, nutrition, alcohol and physical activity (SNAP): population health guide to behavioural risk factors in general practice. South Melbourne: The RACGP, 2004.

24. RACGP. SNAP: a population health guide, 2004.

25. RACGP. Guidelines for preventive activities in general practice.

26. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. Infection control standards for office based practices (4th edn). South Melbourne: The RACGP, 2006.

27. RACGP. Putting prevention into practice, 1998.

28. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. Medical care of older persons in residential aged care facilities. 3rd edn. South Melbourne: The RACGP, 1999.

29. Australian Medical Association. Code of Ethics 2004 (editorially revised 2006). Canberra: AMA, 2006.

30. AMA. Code of Ethics 2004.

31. Physicians for Human Rights and School of Public Health and Primary Healthcare, University of Cape Town. Dual loyalty and human rights in health professional practice: proposed guidelines and institutional mechanisms. USA: Physicians for Human Rights and University of Cape Town, 2002.

32. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. Code of conduct for corporations involved in the provision of management and administrative services in medical centres in Australia. South Melbourne: The RACGP, 2001. Available at www.racgp.org.au.

33. Standard guidelines for corrections in Australia. Revised 2004;21.

34. Haggerty JL, Starfield BH, Adair CE, et al. Continuity of care: a multidisciplinary review. BMJ 2003;327:1219–21.

35. Standard guidelines for corrections in Australia. Revised 2004.

36. Commonweatlh of Australia. Disability Discrimination Act 1992.

37. Romios P, Newby L, Wohlers M, et al. Turning wrongs into rights: learning from consumer reported incidents. Canberra: Health Issues Centre Online, 2003. Available at www.healthissuescentre.org.au.

38. Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care. Better practice guidelines on complaints management for healthcare services. ACSQHC online, 2004. Available at www.safetyandquality.gov.au.

39. Sandars J, Esmail A. The frequency and nature of medical error in primary care: understanding the diversity across studies. Fam Pract 2003;20:231–6.

40. Maxfield D, Grenny J, McMillan R, et al. Silence kills. Aliso Viejo: The American Association of Critical Care Nurses online, 2005. Available at www.aacn.org.

41. Standard guidelines for corrections in Australia. Revised 2004.

42. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. Definition of general practice and general practitioner, 2011. Available at www.racgp.org.au

43. Mohr J, Batalden P. Improving safety on the frontlines: the role of microsystems. Qual Saf Healthcare 2002;11:45–50.

44. Shortell SM, Martselier JA, Lin M, et al. The role of perceived team effectiveness in improving chronic illness care. Med Care 2004;42:1040–8.

45. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. General Practice Management Toolkit. South Melbourne: The RACGP 2007.

46. The Commonwealth of Australia. Privacy Act 2001.

47. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. Handbook for the management of health information in private medical practice. South Melbourne: The RACGP, 2002.

48. The Commonwealth of Australia. Privacy Act 2001.

49. Standard guidelines for corrections in Australia. Revised 2004.

50. Standard guidelines for corrections in Australia. Revised 2004.

51. National Health and Medical Research Council. National statement on ethical conduct in human research. Canberra: NHMRC, 2007.

52. RACGP. Handbook for the management of health information in private medical practice.

53. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. Computer security guidelines. 3rd edn. South Melbourne: The RACGP, 2010

54. The Commonwealth of Australia. Privacy Act 2001.

55. Office of the Privacy Commissioner. Guidelines on privacy in the private health sector. Available at www.privacy.gov.au/materials/types/guidelines/view/6517.

56. RACGP. Computer security guidelines, 2010.

57. RACGP. Computer security guidelines, 2010.

58. Colquhoun MC. Defibrillation by general practitioners. Resuscitation 2002;52:143–8.

59. Murtagh J. The doctor’s bag: what do you really need? Aust Fam Physician 2000;29:25–9.

60. National Health and Medical Research Council. The Australian immunisation handbook. 9th edn. Canberra: NHMRC, 2008.

61. RACGP. Infection control standards for office based practices, 2006.

62. RACGP. Infection control standards for office based practices, 2006.

63. RACGP. Infection control standards for office based practices, 2006.

64. RACGP. Infection control standards for office based practices, 2006.

65. Campbell SM, Braspenning J, Hutchinson A, et al. Research methods used in developing and applying quality indicators in primary care. BMJ 2003;326:816–819.

66. Campbell SM, Roland MO, Quayle JA, et al. Quality indicators for general practice: which ones can general practitioners and health authority managers agree are important and how useful are they? J Pub Health Med 1998;20:414–421.

67. Lillis S. What is good general practice? Three different views. NZFP 2004;31:78–83.

68. Rubin HR, Pronovost P, Diette GB. The advantages and disadvantages of processbased measures of healthcare quality. Int J for Quality in Healthcare 2001;13:469–474.

69. Campbell SM, Roland MO, Quayle JA, et al. Quality indicators for general practice: which ones can general practitioners and health authority managers agree are important and how useful are they? J Pub Health Med 1998;20:414–421.

70. Reason J. Human error: models and management. BMJ 2000;320:768–770.

71. Rosser W, Dovey S, Bordman R, et al. Medical errors in primary care – results of an international study of family practice. Can Fam Phys 2005;51:387–92.

72. Booth B, Hays R, Douglas K. National standards for general practices. Aust Fam Physician 1998;27:1107–9.

73. Naveh E, Katz-Navon T, Stern Z. Readiness to report medical treatment errors – the effects of safety procedures, safety information and priority of safety. Med Care 2006;44:117–123.

74. Wolff AM, Bourke J. Reducing medical errors: a practical guide. Med J Aust 2000;173:247–251.

75. Donabedian A. The quality of care: How can it be assessed? JAMA 1988;260:1743–8.

Standardsprisons cover
DOWNLOAD (PDF 3MB)

SEARCH THIS GUIDELINE

Advertisement

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners

Contact Us

General Inquiries

General Enquiries

Opening hours 8:00 am-8:00 pm AEST

1800 4RACGP

1800 472 247 | +61 (3) 8699 0300 (international)

Payments

Payments

Pay invoices online

RACGP automated payment service: 1800 198 586

Follow us on

Follow RACGP on Twitter Follow RACGP on Facebook Follow RACGP on LinkedIn


Healthy Profession. Healthy Australia Logo

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) ABN 34 000 223 807
RACGP House, 100 Wellington Parade, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 Australia

Terms and conditions | Privacy statement
Sponsor conditions | Delegate conditions