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Clinical Emergency Management Program (CEMP)

Cemp

CPR theory online

Many deaths from heart disease occur outside the hospital setting and present as sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). The reported survival rates for out-of-hospital SCA in Australia vary from 3% to 71%1-10 with the time to defibrillation shown to be a key factor in survival.11-13 Due to time delay, reliance on ambulance defibrillators is a poor option for cardiac arrest in general practice as the chance of survival is reduced by 7–10% each minute defibrillation is delayed.14,15 Resuscitation is possible and all general practices should be capable of providing this level of care.

Therefore gplearning has developed CPR theory online - theory only which focuses on the theory behind cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This activity is suitable for GPs, medical students, practice nurses (PNs), practice managers, receptionists and other practice staff.

CPR theory online - theory only

CPR theory online - theory only is based on the Australian Resuscitation Council Guidelines and focuses on basic techniques required for the immediate commencement of CPR, the minimisation of interruptions to compressions and the need for prompt defibrillation. The activity also describes the legal requirements of providing CPR and the management of an unconscious patient.

CPR theory online - theory only specifically covers:

  • Australian Resuscitation Council guidelines
  • Basic life support and advanced life support
  • Automatic defibrillation
  • Airway management skills.

By the end of each activity participants will be able to:

  • Describe the legal requirements of providing CPR including duty of care, consent and negligence issues.
  • Explain the 'chain of survival'.
  • Identify and describe the management of an unconscious patient.
  • Describe ARC resuscitation guidelines including compression ventilation ratio and rescue breathing.
  • Discuss and understand the need for prompt defibrillation.

CPR theory online - theory only should take approximately 1.5 hours to complete and is approved for 3 Category 2 points in the RACGP QI&CPD Program. This activity is also endorsed for 1.5 Royal College of Nursing, Australia (RCNA) Continuing Nurse Education (CNE) points as part of RCNA's Life Long Learning Program (3LP). CPR theory online - theory only has been allocated 1 (one) AAPM CPD point per 1 (one) hour of education by The Australian Association of Practice Managers Ltd (AAPM).

This activity does not include CPR practice and assessment and does not meet CPR requirements for the triennium.

CPR theory online - theory only is free for RACGP members and is available for GP members at gplearning.racgp.org.au.

References

  1. Bernard S. Outcome from prehospital cardiac arrest in Melbourne, Australia. Emerg Med 1998; 10: 25-29.
  2. Bett JH. Experience with a mobile coronary care unit in Brisbane. Ann Emerg Med 1989; 18: 969–974.
  3. Brennan RJ, Luke C. Failed prehospital resuscitation following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: are further efforts in the emergency department warranted? Emerg Med 1995; 7: 131–138.
  4. Finn JC, Jacobs IG, Holman CD, Oxer HF. Outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in Perth, Western Australia, 1996–1999. Resuscitation 2001; 51: 247–255.
  5. Jackson T, Cameron P. Prehospital defibrillation in Geelong. Emerg Med 1993; 5: 184–187.
  6. Jacobs IG, Oxer HF. A review of pre-hospital defibrillation by ambulance officers in Perth, Western Australia. Med J Aust 1990; 153: 662–664.
  7. Jennings P, Pasco J. Survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the Geelong region of Victoria, Australia. Emerg Med (Fremantle) 2001; 13: 319–325.
  8. Sammel NL, Taylor K, Selig M, O'Rourke MF. New South Wales intensive care ambulance system. Med J Aust 1981; 2: 546–550.
  9. Scott IA, Fitzgerald GJ. Early defibrillation in out-of-hospital sudden cardiac death: an Australian experience. Arch Emerg Med 1993; 10: 1–7.
  10. Wassertheil J, Keane G, Fisher N, Leditschke JF. Cardiac arrest outcomes at the Melbourne Cricket Ground and Shrine of Remembrance using a tiered response strategy — a forerunner to public access defibrillation. Resuscitation 2000; 44: 97–104.
  11. Colquhoun M. Resuscitation by primary care doctors. Resuscitation 2006; 70: 229–37.
  12. Finn JC, Jacobs IG, Holman CD, Oxer HF. Outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in Perth, Western Australia, 1996-1999. Resuscitation 2001; 51: 247–55.
  13. Valenzuela TD, Roe DJ, Nichol G, Clark LL, Spaite DW, Hardman RG. Outcomes of rapid defibrillation by security officers after cardiac arrest in casinos. N Engl J Med 2000; 343: 1206–9.
  14. Jennings P, Pasco J. Survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the Geelong region of Victoria, Australia. Emerg Med (Fremantle) 2001; 13: 319–25.
  15. Larsen MP, Eisenberg MS, Cummins RO, Hallstrom AP. Predicting survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a graphic model. Ann Emerg Med 1993; 22: 1652–8.

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